How Asia can Boost Productivity and Economic Growth

Growth in China and other parts of Asia will depend on skills training, more process mechanization, and better resource use, says McKinsey director Jonathan Woetzel.

“Helping people become more professional and more skilled, whether we’re talking about manufacturing industries and food processing, which can in turn lead to better quality for urban citizens through food safety, or we’re talking about services, and simply delivering professional services on time at a quality that people expect—these are all great opportunities to increase the productivity of Asian society and its economy. That’s where the real challenge and opportunity lies for Asia.”

Read and download the McKinsey interview here.

Education to Employment (a must see McKinsey video)

A MUST see for higher education leaders.

Young people today are three times as likely as their parents to be out of work. Yet many employers can’t find people with the right entry-level skills to fill their jobs. How to close the gap? In this video, McKinsey directors Diana Farrell and Mona Mourshed share insights from their research with 8,000 stakeholders.  It also profiles two innovative organizations—one in India and one in the United States—that are pioneering new approaches to successfully transition greater numbers of students from education into employment.

Download the video from this URL: https://dl.dropbox.com/u/12420365/Videos/Education%20to%20employment%20%20%20McKinsey%20%20%20Company.rv

California Universities Experimenting with MOOCs for Credit

It seems the university business model is finally evolving to engage more learners and be more inclusive (formally).

San Jose State University announced an unusual pilot project with Udacity, a for-profit provider of the massive open online courses, to jointly create three introductory mathematics classes. The courses will be free online, but students who want credit from San Jose State will be able to take them for just $150, far less than the $450 to $750 that students would typically pay for a credit-bearing course. The University of California system may eventually decide to work with MOOC providers as well: Leaders of Udacity and Coursera, another for-profit MOOC company, were scheduled to appear before the university’s Board of Regents this week.

http://chronicle.com/article/California-State-U-Will/136677/?cid=at&utm_source=at&utm_medium=en